Restored Texaco Station, posted 2013-07-28

Last week I was out exploring new photo opportunities with limited success.  On my way home I decided to drive through Desoto, MO, to see if there were any interesting images to be had around the Union Pacific railroad shops there.  As I drove into town, I saw what appeared to be a pristine Texaco gas station from the mid-1900’s.  The building didn’t appear to be open and there was no information about what was housed there or why this station existed.

Right side with sign

Right side with sign

After some research, I found a local newspaper article that contained a little background on the building:

“Recently DeSoto added another attraction to its list of distinctions. One of the town’s original gas stations has been fully restored to what it looked like many years ago.
The old gas station goes all the way back to the early 1900’s and is one of the oldest buildings in town. It was still an active gas station up until about 10 years ago. The gas station sits at north Main and Mahn in the center of the city. It has the attached service island and the original Texaco star sign.”

The article also indicated that they will occasionally have someone pull up for gas but the pumps are not functional :-).

I had another chance to visit the area yesterday so I stopped and took some photos of the details of the station.  This restored building brought back many memories of my childhood when one of my uncles owned a small Esso station in my home town.  The building and the brands were different but one can imagine the same sort of conversations and activities occurring in both places.

A closer view of the front of pump island

A closer view of the front of pump island

The right hand pump.

The right hand pump.

One of the interesting things I noted was that the globe on top each pump matched the decal on the lower portion of the opposite pump.  I also noted that these must have been later vintage pumps, or at least they lasted until a later era, as evidenced by the lead warning on the side of the pump.

The other pump and the lamp on the pump island

The other pump and the lamp on the pump island

Air up your tires here

Air up your tires here

This air station is much fancier than those at Fryman’s Esso in my youth.  One of the nice features of this one is the ability to see what the air pressure was in your tires while you were filling them.

Sign above door

Sign above door

This small sign is located above the entry door to the building.  What may not be obvious on first glance is that it is designed to spin in the breeze.

Front and left side of building

Front and left side of building

And, in closing, another view of the front of the station along with the left side of the building.

 

 

 

 

 

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